Spirit Of The Seventies Ducati

Ducati GT1000 custom
A stern test for established custom builders is how they handle the ‘budget’ job. Can they capture the flavor of the mega-buck builds at half the cost? The English workshop Spirit of The Seventies has just taken this test, and passed with flying colors.

Tim Rogers and Kev Taggart call their latest machine the Ducati GT-R. But despite the name, performance modifications were not on the client’s wishlist. “Our client didn’t even have a bike, which was great news. We knew exactly what to use as the donor—a Ducati GT1000.”

Ducati GT1000 custom
Design inspiration came from the classic car world; the styling and colors take cues from vintage machinery such Porsche 356s and the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato.

Ducati GT1000 custom
Spirit overhauled the motor and matched it to a bespoke exhaust system, made by Co-Built and given a ceramic coating by Zircotec. Unlike many low-volume custom systems, it retains the lambda sensor—and has also posted fat curves on the dyno. A new seat and tail unit was designed, with the seat pad (and bar grips) finished in classic Brooks grip tape. (If you own a GT1000 and like this setup, you’re in luck—Spirit are planning to offer it for sale.)

Ducati GT1000 custom
The headlight is Spirit’s own design, and like the wheels and engine cases, has been powdercoated. Other bodywork tweaks include Oberon indicators, a cut-down front fender and a refinished tank to fit the custom seat unit. The bars are SportClassic high-rise clip-ons, and the elegant color scheme comes from Revolution Paint.

It’s not a bargain basement build, but an interesting spin on revitalising a secondhand bike—without stripping it back to the frame. I’d say it looks even better than the original GT1000, and that’s no easy feat either.

Check out our coverage of previous Spirit of The Seventies builds here, and follow the Spirit website for their latest news.

Ducati GT1000 custom