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The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
By the time the nineties rolled around, the reputation of the Honda CB750 was losing its luster. The iconic straight four had softened, and the F2 model was more suited to cruising than blasting through canyons.

But the build quality and engineering was still top-notch, which makes the ‘Seven Fifty’ a good used buy today. This sleek build from Spain’s Bolt Motor Co. ditches the clunky styling and cranks up the dynamics with a major suspension upgrade.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
“We built this for our friend Santiago, from Palma de Mallorca,” says Bolt boss Adrián Campos. “He wanted a classic look, but with all the modern elements—comfortable and easy to ride every day.”

The donor bike was in excellent condition: a 1995 F2, which means it has a 73 hp detuned version of the CBX750 mill—which is creamy smooth and torquey, and good for almost 130 mph (205 kph).

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
“The engine was in pretty good shape,” says Adrián. “We just changed the gaskets and overhauled the carbs.” But since Bolt shares its premises with one of Spain’s leading racecar builders, Adrián couldn’t resist adding K&N filter pods and a pair of stubby SuperTrapp mufflers too.

The stock Seven Fifty has safe if somewhat uninspiring handling, so Adrián has replaced the original 41mm forks and triples with newer (and beefier) units from a Ducati Monster.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
The shocks have been upgraded to Hagon units that offer classic styling with modern performance, and the front monobloc brakes are from Brembo.

The stock cast wheels are gone, replaced by much more attractive spoked rims of uncertain original. “We don’t know what bike the wheels came from,” Adrián admits.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
“We just bought two 17-inch wheels from the same motorcycle, widened the flanges, and fitted new spokes.” The chunky rubber is Continental’s TKC70 pattern.

The heavy lifting is in the frame, though. The back half of the tubing is all-new, from just behind the fuel tank to the end of the seat—including the shock mounts.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
For many builders this would be quite a mission, but Bolt’s workshop effectively has access to all the tools of the race car operation. Still, even Adrián found it challenging.

A plush new seat, designed for comfort, sits atop the new framework—with gorgeous diamond contrast stitching and a simple strap across the middle.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
Right ahead is a tank lifted from an early CB750, which probably dates to around 1970. The off-white paint is offset by deep green side panels and gold pinstripes, with a chromed tank badge that appears to be lifted from a 1960s-vintage Honda car—possibly an S800.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
In keeping with the ‘modern classic’ vibe, Bolt have installed Renthal bars, plus period Brembo levers and Puig controls. To keep the cockpit super-clean, most switches and ancillaries are from Motogadget.

The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty
If you’ve been to the Balearic island of Mallorca, you’ll know how beautiful it is—especially when you hit the roads that head out from the tourist traps on the coast.

Anyone else feeling a twinge of jealousy for Santiago and his muy elegante new ride?

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The modern classic, Honda style: Bolt’s 1995 Seven Fifty

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