1980 Honda CBX custom

Honda CBX
Rick Hayberg of
 Sarasota, Florida, has worked in the auto industry for thirty years. And like a lot of riders, he was drawn back to a bike he’d seen many years ago. “I was fortunate enough to ride a brand new Honda CBX back in 1980, purchased by a good friend. Between the looks and sound that the CBX made, the bike remained stuck in my mind for many years. I bought my own CBX in 2008, and started my quest to create a classic old bike with the modern innovations found in the sportbikes of today.” Suspension, brakes, tires, and many upgrades followed. “My build was supposed to be a ‘budget’ build, but soon got out of hand.” Parts were recycled from Hondas, Suzukis, Yamahas and Kawasakis, with a few bits thrown in from Ducati. Even more amazingly, Rick did the entire build himself, in his garage at home. And that includes fabrication, welding, machining, electrical, paint and carbon fiber work. (The bodywork is not painted: virtually all the bodywork is 2×2 twill carbon fiber.) There are too many mods to list, but they include GSX-R750 forks and six-piston brake callipers, a VFR swingarm/wheel assembly, and 
a Ducati subframe and tail section. “Because this was a naked bike, and because of my fondness for the Truimph Speed Triple’s looks, I had to go with the big dual lights up front.” One of the few things left untouched is that glorious CBX engine—a 1047 cc, 24-valve, DOHC air-cooled straight six with over 100 hp at the crank. With Rick’s suspension upgrades handling the twisties, this is a CBX that will leave many modern middleweight sportbikes in its dust.

  • Twisted

    Now that is my kind of bike, excellent job, very jealous :)

  • francois

    more photos please!

    • http://www.bikeexif.com Chris Hunter

      For those who want to see more pictures, head over to the Custom Fighters forum.

  • http://www.car137.com Glenn Edley

    Single swingarms aren’t my favourite on older bikes but this looks excellent with that cool wheel for all to see. Great bike. More pics if you have them please.

  • Viv

    Yes more pictures please, that is a stunning build

  • Luker

    Super sexy. I’d love to do something similar to my 82′ 750F, but I agree, need the dual shocks for the older Hondas.

  • Skrewgun

    Gorgeous mix of old and new. I’ve always admired these bikes – that super wide motor looks so beefy and impressive. I knew a mechanic that had one and said keeping those six carbs synched and running properly was a constant battle though.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Russ-Taylor/710606004 Russ Taylor

    Just to be different I think it looks awful :-) To each his own, I’m sure the builder wouldn’t want my bike either, mis-mash of wheels, obvious choice rear tail unit, it just looks like all the nice bits from different bikes we cobbled together to make Frankenstein. There is little harmony between parts.

    I’m certain though in the metal I’d want it, just the way it works, easy to criticise from this comfy chair ;-)

  • big ted

    Great build, great engine, but never could stomach gold wheels on a motorcycle (or gold forks/shocks) especially on a “classic:, but man what an engine!

  • http://norcalbikers.blogspot.com Erik

    That is a beautifully done bike. I’ve always like the CBX too and really like how this updated model has turned out! Very nice work!

  • http://custommotorshow.co.uk paul Miles
  • Christopher Sellars

    Lots of georgeous work , I had one of these set up as a cafe racer in Bolivia about 15 years ago, the chap who said the carbs were a nightmare is spot on ! even when I managed to get them even it drank fuel like an XJ12 ! I think he should have thrown the tank, I had a tiny CG honda tank on mine, really made the engine stand out! Performance wise, in a straight line nothing could touch it, but twisties , or even just sweeping curves….. forget it….. damn thing was dangerous ! no way could you throw it around…. it didn’t want to budge ! I can only surmise that it suffered from some sort of gyroscopic precession, perhaps because of the length of the crankshaft.