Moto Guzzi NTX by Venier Customs

Moto Guzzi NTX
Back in the 90s, Moto Guzzi built a polizia version of its NTX 750 dual sport bike. Tall and imposing, it struck fear into the hordes of Italian teenagers tearing around without a license on mopeds and dirtbikes.

One of those kids was Stefano Venier, who today runs the entirely respectable workshop Venier Customs. And he’s just turned the tables on the polizia by chopping up an NTX to create this very smart custom—with military-style paint and scrambler styling cues.

Moto Guzzi NTX
“I wanted to make a real Moto Guzzi scrambler, using not the V75 street bike, but the off-road variant,” says Venier. The NTX was a practical choice: although it’s part of the V75 small block family, it was a true dual sport with an unusual lack of frame: the engine formed the connection between the steering head and the swingarm. (A design later adapted by BMW for its R1100GS, but minus the steel rail that connected the NTX’s steering head to the back of the engine.)

Moto Guzzi NTX
Venier calls this bike the ‘Tractor V75’ and little remains of the original NTX bodywork. The fenders, side panels, tank and bracketry are all new. He’s also changed the geometry, shortening the Marzocchi forks and retuning the Bitubo shocks. The rear subframe is also completely new, supporting a Brat-style seat that actually has useful padding. The tires are from Vee Rubber and there’s a custom 2-into-1 exhaust system.

Moto Guzzi NTX
The overall look is low-key but very stylish, with the tank finished in olive green. (It also looks to be a good size, if not quite as large as the 30-liter NTX original.) And of course, being a Venier Customs build, the quality of workmanship is exemplary.

Moto Guzzi NTX
If you like Venier’s style, check out his lovely Moto Guzzi V75 ‘Corsaiola,’ the sister bike to this NTX. The Venier Customs website showcases more of Stefano’s work, and you can follow Venier’s news via the company Facebook page.

Images by Donatello Trevisiol.

Moto Guzzi NTX