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MotoMorphic JaFM

Rotax motorcycle
In the holiday spirit of not taking things too seriously, here’s a curve ball to throw into the Bike EXIF mix. A lot of strange contraptions come my way, but this Rotax-engined number is one of the most extreme motorcycles I’ve seen for a while. It’s built by Jim Davis of MotoMorphic—based in San Rafael, California—and costs $100,000 or more, according to specification.

Inspiration apparently came from ‘four seemingly disparate things: streetfighters, a fat tire, American muscle cars, and fighter planes.’ The design started with the tires, namely Avon’s Venom: There’s a 250 on the front and a whopping 300×35/18 at the back. So does it handle? ‘There are a few idiosyncrasies with the JaFM,’ say MotoMorphic, ‘but nothing that precludes the enjoyment of the ride. Due to the wide nature of the front tire, the JaFM tends to stand up under front trail braking. It can easily be compensated for, and trail braking should be exercised with caution on any motorcycle.’

Rotax motorcycle
To match the huge tires, the main frame has 5” diameter tubes, with the secondary tubes at 4”. Gas is stored in the tubes, nearly seven gallons of it, and the massive air scoop is modeled on the belly scoop from a WWII P-51 Mustang. The motor is a dry-sumped Rotax V990 with an integrated 6-speed transmission and slipper clutch. (It’s the same Austrian-built V-twin unit that powered the Aprilia RSV Tuono and still does service today in the Can-Am Spyder three-wheeler.) MotoMorphic uses a Dynojet Power Commander III to optimize the mapping, and claims 110 hp and 70 ft-lbs of torque at the rear wheel. Suspension is Öhlins at the front and Penske at the back, and the adjustable handlebars reportedly feel ‘natural’.

My first question was, Why? But there’s an answer to that in the entertaining MotoMorphic FAQ: ‘If you have to ask, you won’t understand. No, really.’

[Via La Repubblica. Thanks to Cristiano Bertacchini.]

Rotax motorcycle
Rotax motorcycle
Rotax motorcycle