Laverda custom motorcycle

From Good To Great: The Wrenchmonkees Laverda 750

If there’s one company that symbolizes the style of the new wave custom scene, it’s the Wrenchmonkees. Their motorcycles are raw, simple and pure—the legendary Danish design aesthetic applied to two wheels, and roughed up a little. An early ’70s Laverda 750 given the Wrenchmonkees treatment sounds like a marriage made in heaven. And the…

Laverda SF2

Laverda SF2 resto-mod

Ah, Laverda. The great, lost name of motorcycling. KTM now has a mortgage on vibrant orange motorcycles, but in the 70s the color was synonymous with the Breganze factory in northern Italy. Few builders get the chance to work on Laverdas these days, but Takashi Iwamoto of Cascade Cafe Racer in Hawthorne, California is one…

Laverda Jota

Laverda Jota

One of the great tragedies of modern motorcycling is the death of the Laverda name. The brand was bought by Aprilia at the turn of the century—along with Moto Guzzi—but the familiar ‘SFC Orange’ has yet to reappear in showrooms. To my eyes, that lovely color has always looked best on a Jota, and this…

Alex Ozzard-Low's

Laverda Jota

The Laverda Jota sticks in my mind as the ultimate seventies superbike: it’s the two-wheeled equivalent of the iconic Lamborghini Muira. This 1977 Jota is owned by Alex Ozzard-Low, and after digging around, I was surprised to find that the Jota was not a true factory bike. According to Classic Mechanics, “Developed by Roger Slater…

1953 Laverda 75 Sport

This exquisite little machine, the color of a delicate Italian caffelatte, caught my attention on the website of Australian motorcycle photographer Phil Aynsley. The picture…

Norton Ala’Verda 850

This delicately beautiful cafe racer uses a Laverda trellis frame and a late-production, modified Commando 850 engine. It was built by French violin-maker Daniel Delfour,…

Laverda 1200

Tony Starr, a photographer from Melbourne, spotted this motorcycle in the street and squeezed off a quick shot. I’d say it’s a Laverda 1200 from…