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Zero Gravity: Bad Winners’ lightweight Thruxton cafe

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
Triumph’s new Thruxton R is a knockout. Buy one, and you’re getting a drop-dead-gorgeous modern classic with the go to match the show.

Unfortunately, yours won’t be the only Thruxton R in town: The bike is selling like the proverbial hotcakes. If you want something that will stand out, you should give Paris-based Bad Winners a call.

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
Shop owner Walid Ben Lamine has opened up the order book for a limited series of five truly special Triumphs, based on the previous generation Thruxton. This is the prototype, and it’s packed with enough upgrades to give the current ‘R’ a run for its money.

“Creating a clean and simple bike is not an easy thing,” says Walid. “What I like doing the most is improving the bikes—finding the perfect geometry, the perfect setting of performance and style.”

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
The most obvious change is the new bodywork: Walid’s ditched the Thruxton’s bulbous tank for a custom-made steel unit, modeled on the Yamaha SR400. It’s matched to a hand-made tail section, capped off with a leather seat and sitting on a trimmed subframe.

But this cafe racer’s new clothes only tell half the story. Look closely, and you’ll notice that the normally fuel-injected Thruxton is now rocking a pair of Keihin CR35 carbs. Go even deeper, and you’ll find a homemade CDI controlling everything—giving Walid complete control over the tune.

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
There’s also a set of Arrow two-into-one exhaust headers, terminating in a Spark muffler. We haven’t seen any dyno figures, but Walid describes the output as “insane.”

The Thruxton is a whole lot lighter now too, mostly thanks to a set of 17-inch carbon fiber wheels from Dymag, wrapped in Michelin Power Cup Evo tires.

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
“I don’t want to talk about the lightness of the wheels,” says Walid unconvincingly, “but the feeling is so ‘reactive’ I’ve called the bike ‘Zero Gravity’.”

Suspension upgrades include a set of Bitubo rear shocks, and the upside down forks off a Triumph Daytona 675. The Daytona’s triple clamps were adapted to fit the Thruxton, and the front brake swapped out for a dual-disc Beringer setup.

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
Working under the hood, Walid rewired the whole bike around a Motogadget m-Unit controller. The bar-end flashers, a speedo and handlebar switches are also from Motogadget, while the clip-ons and grips are from Renthal.

There’s a lot to ogle—like the carbon fiber front mudguard, and the stainless steel brake lines.

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
“This Thruxton 900 is probably one of the most efficient bikes I’ve done,” says Walid. “From the Keihin CR35s, to the carbon fiber wheels and the racing style lines, this bike is all about the racing track.”

If this ‘Stage 2’ Thruxton is too rich for you, you could commission Walid to build you a ‘Stage 1’ variant—with all the style, but more affordable brakes, suspension and wheels.

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners
Our Christmas budget is all spent though, so we’ll be over here with our hands in our pockets, and our jaws on the floor.

Bad Winners | Facebook | Instagram | Photos by Guillaume Petranto

Zero Gravity: A lightweight Triumph Thruxton café racer by Bad Winners