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Road Tested: Gear from Icon 1000, REV’IT! and Saint

Road Tested: Gear from Icon 1000, REV’IT! and Saint
I’ve got a thing for stealthy, murdered-out gear. So this week, I’m profiling some low-profile pieces: the Brigand jacket from ICON 1000, the Arch gloves from REV’IT! and a new version of the popular Saint Unbreakable Stretch jeans.

Let’s take a closer look.

Review: The ICON 1000 Brigand jacket
ICON 1000 Brigand jacket The Brigand jacket follows ICON 1000’s tried and true formula of gear that is a little bit retro, a little bit casual and a little bit tactical—while still being unapologetically ride-focused.

Icon have absolutely nailed its bomber jacket design, and I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that it’s become an instant staple in my gear closet on looks alone. It’s well made too, and loaded with little touches that add to its style, comfort and practicality.

The main chassis consists of a black denim cordura that has a fantastic hand to it, and doesn’t weigh a ton. The cuffs and lower edge feature knitted bits to hit that bomber jacket vibe, and there’s a slight drop tail at the rear for extra coverage.

Review: The ICON 1000 Brigand jacket
The collar locks down with a small flap and a two-position press stud setup, with a loop for folding it back and tucking it if you prefer that. (It’s also lined with a softer fabric inside.) You also get a chunky YKK zipper up front, two hand-warmer pockets with zippers, a Napoleon pocket inside and two chest pockets with magnetic closures.

But the Brigand doesn’t just look good—it’s also well sorted on the protection front. Cordura has long been a popular choice for abrasion resistance, and Icon have also included D30 armor at the elbows, shoulders and back. D30’s biggest selling point is how flexible is—and it’s incorporated it into the Brigand so well that it’s slim enough to work well off the bike, too.

Review: The ICON 1000 Brigand jacket
The overall cut is Icon’s ‘Sport’ fit, which they say is ‘loose without being baggy,’ and includes a slight pre-curve in the arms. It hits the mark for my bigger frame, leaving me just enough room to layer up if I need to. With accordion panels at the shoulder blades, there’s plenty of mobility while riding. I would have liked it if the drop tail went a smidge lower though—of if Icon had included a way to hook it to your belt.

There’s an extra little feature on the sleeves: elasticated thumb loops, to keep the sleeves locked in place at all times. They’re stitched in deep enough so that you can easily slip shorter gloves under the cuffs (and longer gloves over), but they can be hit and miss. They didn’t quite gel with some of my mid-length gloves, but in those cases I simply tucked them away.

Review: The ICON 1000 Brigand jacket
The inside of the jacket’s lined with a flannel-like fabric, giving it a snug, cooler-weather feel. Icon have included a very unique ventilation system though. You can flip up the chest pocket flaps and tuck them into hidden stash pockets, to reveal lazer-cut perforations across the tops of the pockets. It’s a clever concept, but in reality it doesn’t push that much air through—and it’s too fussy to operate with a single gloved hand while riding.

As an added bonus, you also get a removable rain liner. It packs small into its own dedicated pouch, and zips into the main jacket in less than 90 seconds. And it doesn’t add much bulk, so it’s handy as an extra wind-blocking layer too.

Review: The ICON 1000 Brigand jacket
There is one caveat though: since it’s an internal rain layer, it’s designed to keep just you dry, while the jacket’s outer gets water logged. And anything in the pockets is going to get damp too. It hasn’t rained since I got the Brigand, so I haven’t tested it in wet weather, but I’d probably rely on it more as an emergency measure than my go-to for truly foul weather.

But for mild to chilly days, the Brigand’s a champ. And it’s subtle enough that I don’t feel the need to ditch it the second I get off the bike either.

Price: $300-320 | Buy

Review: The REV'IT! Arch motorcycle glove
REV’IT! Arch glove REV’IT!’s stylish urban range balances subtlety and protection well, and the Arch glove is a noteworthy addition to the line-up. Designed for warmer weather, it’s a short(ish) cuff glove that combines drum dyed goatskin and 3D air mesh panels, with a low key aesthetic that’ll pair well with just about anything.

Despite the minimal vibe, the Arch is well put together…and serious about protection, too. REV’IT! have included a full size, hard shell knuckle protector, and small temper foam pads in the palm. (I had to Google ‘temper foam’; it’s a type of memory foam that offers good impact resistance.) There’s also some of the company’s proprietary PWR Shield abrasion resistance fabric at key spots on the palm.

Review: The REV'IT! Arch motorcycle glove
The cuff is a wide neoprene affair, with a low profile hook and loop closure at the back, and a discreet rubber REV’IT! logo up top. It’s really tight while you pull (or jiggle) the glove on, but once your hand’s in and it’s cinched down, it’s both snug and flexible. It’s also nice that the softer side of the hook and loop fabric is on the cuff side—so you don’t need to worry about grabbing the rough side when you pull the Arch on.

On the hand, the Arch glove is quite comfortable, even if it is a bit snug. It does run a size smaller than most gloves—so check the size chart carefully when you buy, and consider sizing up if you’re on the cusp. It’s also really tight around the knuckle protector area at first—but I’ve managed to break it in nicely after just a few rides, and suspect it’ll get even more comfortable with time.

Review: The REV'IT! Arch motorcycle glove
Airflow is decent too, for a glove with this level of protection (and leather). And little touches like the flex panels on the knuckles are nice. My only criticism is the fingertips: they’re too long, and they’re not touchscreen compatible. But if you’re not fussed about using your phone in between rides, the Arch’s blend of style, comfort and protection is tough to top.

Price: USD 79.99 | Buy

Review: Saint Unbreakable Stretch motorcycle jeans
Saint Unbreakable Stretch jeans I can be pretty slack about gearing up properly—and riding pants have traditionally been the item I skip the most. I don’t like the bulk of cordura or Kevlar-reinforced denim, and I’m not mad about adding armor into the mix too.

And yes: I’m fully aware that lower body impact protection is a big deal, and that I’m compromising. But within that compromise, I like to opt for pants that look good, feel good, and offer as much abrasion resistance as possible. So I’ve been sticking with Saint’s denim for the longest time.

Review: Saint Unbreakable Stretch motorcycle jeans
Their latest offering—the Unbreakable Stretch—is their best pair of jeans yet. This is the second iteration of the Australian brand’s ‘Stretch’ denims (I reviewed the originals two years ago), and features subtle changes that have made a tangible difference.

Saint use a special denim in their jeans that’s woven with the ultra-strong material Dyneema, and also has a little Elastane mixed in. So there’s only one layer of denim, with no extra abrasion resistant panels stitched in. They’ve used less Dyneema in the mix than before, but thanks to how the fabrics are woven, the final result is just as tough. On its own, the fabric has an AA Rating for impact abrasion resistance, according to the Darmstadt prEN 17092-1:2017 standard.

Review: Saint Unbreakable Stretch motorcycle jeans
I’ve worn my Saint stretchies religiously for the past two years, and to the touch there’s not much between the old and new denim. Except that on the bike—where the jeans’ inherent stretch properties help mobility while riding—the new ones are just that much more flexible. Saint have also perfected the overall fit and cut, and these are now on par with (if not more comfortable than) my go-to Levis 511s. The denim itself’s a little heavier than my Levis, but it’s still lightweight as riding pants go.

They also come in black now (which I’m stoked about) as well as two different blue finishes, depending on what cut you pick—slim or straight. The slims taper towards the ankles, while the straights don’t, and both have a low rise fit. They fit true to size too, so you can just pick your normal jeans size).

Review: Saint Unbreakable Stretch motorcycle jeans
They only come in one length though (about 33/34 long), but that’s another improvement; the previous model was way too long. The downside is if you flip them over, the Dyneema-enriched denim has a white finish.

The overall styling is very typical for jeans, with a zippered fly and a neat little Saint ‘wing’ embroidered on the back pocket. That casual style, coupled with their overall comfort, have made them an instant staple on and off the bike. And judging by how well my older Saints have faded over time, I’m looking forward to seeing what these look like two years from now.

Colors: Black, Indigo (straight), bleached blue (slim) | Price: $339 | Buy

Images by Devin Paisley

Review: Saint Unbreakable Stretch motorcycle jeans

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