Beach Boy: A surf-ready Yamaha WR155R scrambler from Thailand

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
A surfboard rack on a motorcycle might seem like a gimmick to some, but if you live in Bali and love surfing, it’s a downright necessity. The Indonesian island is peppered with surf spots—and a small bike with a rack is the best way to get to them. It doesn’t hurt if that motorcycle looks as good as this Yamaha WR155R scrambler.

The bike was built by Dream Fast Co. for Tiw, the founder of the Laem Yah Rayong Surf Club. Both parties are based in Thailand, but the influence came directly from Bali’s motorcycle and surf culture. Tiw has Balinese friends who use vintage enduro bikes to find hard-to-reach surf spots, and wanted to capture that vibe in his Yamaha WR155R.

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
Dream Fast Co.’s mandate was to take the modern and reliable WR155R and inject it with a big dose of classic Yamaha dirt bike style. It sounds simple enough on paper, but in reality, it meant wading through piles of plastic to shed the WR155R’s contemporary aesthetic.

Once the Yamaha was denuded of its plastics, the Dream Fast Co. crew set about reworking its lines. The subframe was hacked off, and a new one was fabricated, this time with a kicked-up loop at the back. A new seat sits up top; it’s designed for one, but there is a smidge of space out back if you and your passenger want to get extremely cozy.

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
The team looked to Yamaha’s history for inspiration next, fabricating an aluminum fuel tank to mimic the design of the iconic Yamaha XT500. They also shaped a set of aluminum fenders, again taking cues from older bikes. Together with a set of multi-faceted handmade side panels and custom radiator guards, the new bodywork pulls off the vintage look well.

Dream Fast Co. left the suspension and brakes alone, but upgraded the forks with stone guards and neoprene sleeves, to keep them protected and dirt-free. The OEM wheels were re-laced with new gold rims from RCB in Thailand, then shod with fresh dual-sport tires.

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
Moving to the cockpit, the guys fabbed a set of high and wide bars to nail the classic scrambler look. They’re fitted with slim mirrors and blue ODI grips, with the original dash mounted just in front of them.

A generous LED headlight lights the way, mounted in a custom surround and flanked by a pair of tiny turn signals. Dream Fast Co. designed the headlight as a nod to the mega-bright setups used by Baja 1000 race bikes at night. The rear fender wears a classic taillight found at a swap meet, with the rear turn signals mounted to tabs on the frame rails.

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
A burly sump guard does duty lower down, since Tiw is most likely to take the WR155R way off the beaten track. And although the exhaust is a custom part, it’s a dead ringer for the type of mufflers you’d find on old dirt bikes.

Then there’s the removable surfboard rack. It’s a simple and tidy design, with a twin cradle that attaches to a custom mount just below the seat. Look closely, and you’ll spot another mounting point further forward; Dream Fast Co. added that so that Tiw can extend the rack if he wants to carry a longboard.

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
It’s a great set of mods, augmented by an even greater livery that should be familiar to classic Dakar rally fans. Dream Fast Co. borrowed the colors and graphics from Yamaha’s 1990s Sonauto-sponsored rally race bike, tweaking them to suit the lines of the WR155R. The frame’s been redone in blue to match.

But the cherry on the cake is the scrambler’s inspired seat cover. It’s the work of Ya Seat Custom in Bangkok, and it features a stitching pattern that evokes a sense of ocean waves.

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.
We’d be lying if we said we’re not a tad envious of Tiw and his sharp new runabout. We can’t imagine a better way to flit from surf spot to surf spot along the Thai coast.

Dream Fast Co. Instagram

Yamaha WR155R scrambler by Dream Fast Co.

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