Colossus: Maria’s mighty custom Yamaha XJR1300

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
The XJR1300 is hot property right now, and it’s all Yamaha’s fault. First they reissued the iconic model line, and then fed it into the prolific Yard Built program. Interest in the four-cylinder brute has never been higher.

Custom XJRs of both the new and old variety are now streaming onto the interwebs. This is the latest one to hit our desks—an imposing ’99-spec machine from the Portuguese maestros at Maria Motorcycles.

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
The bike was originally built up for Maria’s founder, Luis Correia. But when a new customer walked into the shop, plans quickly changed. “He fell in love with the massive look of the bike,” says Luis.

Even though work had already started, the new owner wanted something fresh—so he left it up to Maria to conceive a new design.

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
The ‘Colossus’ project kicked off with a full tear down. Every part was re-painted, and the frame given a matte black treatment. And all the fasteners were swapped out for stainless steel items, with a few select bolts coated in zinc.

Maria liked the shape of the XJR’s stock fuel tank, but not its bulk. So they cut, sectioned and rejoined the tank, maintaining the same profile in a slimmer package that would further emphasis the size of the engine.

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
A neat cut-and-loop set the subframe up for a custom-made nubuck and leather seat. The client wanted to retain two-up functionality, so the passenger pegs are still in place—and Maria built a second seat that can be swapped out.

Under the seat unit is a custom-made electronics tray. It hosts the ignition, a pair of Lithium-ion batteries and a Motogadget m-Unit controller (around which the bike’s been rewired).

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
The carbs have been treated to a Dynojet kit and a set of K&N filters. But it’s the beefy, yet intricate, four-into-four exhaust system that steals the show.

There are plenty of nice off-the-shelf parts too. The wheels are 17-inch Kineo tubeless units, wrapped in grippy Continental ContiRoad Attack rubber. A Renthal chain and sprockets transmit the power to the back wheel, and the front forks have been upgraded with heavier oil and Öhlins springs.

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
The rear turn signals, bar-end turn signals, grips and switches are all from Motogadget. The speedo’s sitting on an aluminum bracket, designed to utilize the original handlebar clamp mounting points. The cockpit’s finished off with LSL clip-ons.

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
Up front is a vintage Harley headlight, with a LED taillight tucked away under the rear frame hoop. The front fender is a hand-made piece.

As with all Maria builds, the paint is exemplary: slick and well thought out, right down to the last detail. (Note the valve covers and the carb tops).

Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.
With elegant lines and impeccable finishes, Colossus is both a little classy and a little frightening.

“The bike has become very light and agile, since we’ve removed many of the original parts,” Luis says. “It runs really smoothly at low speeds—but when you turn the throttle it gets really scary!”

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Colossus: A mighty Yamaha XJR1300 from Portugal.