First Look: The new Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400

Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400 first look
After much anticipation, Triumph’s worst-kept secret is out. Here’s a look at the all-new Triumph 400 range, including the Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400, both slated for release in 2024

Anyone familiar with Triumph’s usual nomenclature should be able to figure out which is which. The Triumph Scrambler 400 X quite obviously borrows its styling from the existing Scrambler 900 and 1200, while the Speed 400 is styled in line with the Speed Twin 900 and 1200. But, as the ‘400’ designation applies, both share the same chassis and 400 cc engine.

Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400 first look
Developed in partnership with the gigantic Indian manufacturer Bajaj, the new 400 cc range is a play by Triumph to offer a lower point of entry into the brand. Triumph hasn’t announced any pricing yet, but they have claimed that the bikes will be “competitively priced.”

We expect them to go head to head with bikes like the KTM 390 Duke, Husqvarna Svartpilen 401, and BMW G 310 R.

Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400 first look
The engine’s an all-new 398 cc single-cylinder mill, sporting fuel injection, and liquid cooling. It has a four-valve, DOHC head, a weighted and balanced crankshaft, and a finger-follower valvetrain with DLC coatings to help reduce friction. All this, and a six-speed transmission.

Triumph calls it their ‘TR Series’ engine, as a nod to the legendary Triumph Trophy. They’re claiming a power output of 40 PS [39.45 hp], with 37.5 Nm of torque. That puts it in the same ballpark as the Husky and KTM, albeit a smidgen down on horsepower.

Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400 first look
The new 400 range also features all the modern-day electronic frou-frou. The platform uses a ride-by-wire throttle, with switchable traction control, ABS (switchable on the Scrambler 400 X), and a torque-assist clutch. The lighting is all LED, an immobilizer comes standard, and the dash is a tidy analog and LCD combo unit.

Visually, the Triumph 400 motor can’t quite escape its budget bike underpinnings, but it still manages to bring some panache to this end of the market. There’s a lot to pack in—but Triumph and Bajaj have done an admirable job of dressing it up like their bigger bikes. The cylinder head wears fake cooling fins and a stylish ‘TR Series’ badge; contrasting black and brushed finishes keep things classy.

Triumph Speed 400 first look
The Speed 400 [above] and Scrambler 400 X share a chassis, save for a few model-specific differences. It’s a new frame design for Triumph, complete with a bolt-on rear subframe and a cast aluminum swingarm. The seat heights are listed as 790 mm (Speed) and 835 mm (Scrambler X), and the weights at 170 and 179 kilos [375 and 395 lbs].

The Triumph Speed 400 wears 43 mm upside-down forks, 17” wheels, and a road-orientated geometry and wheelbase. The brakes use braided lines, with a radial caliper gripping a 300 mm disc up front.

Triumph Scrambler 400 X first look
Triumph has given the Scrambler 400 X [above] a longer wheelbase and longer travel suspension, with a bigger front wheel (19”). Combined with a wider set of handlebars, it should give the Scrambler X at least a measure of stability on gravel roads. Helping it achieve its desert sled aspirations are a larger brake pedal, grippy footpegs that are repositioned for an optimal standing position, and a larger (320 mm) front brake disc.

Each model has a unique muffler design, but both exhaust systems are low-slung; no high-mounted pipes for Scrambler X. The trim varies from model to model too. The Speed 400 wears bar-end mirrors, while the Scrambler 400 X opts for traditional mirrors.

Triumph Scrambler 400 X first look
The Scrambler X also adds a headlight grill, hand guards, a handlebar cross-bar, a two-piece seat, and a more roomy front fender. And yes—as is customary, Triumph is releasing a whole bunch of accessories for each bike.

Each bike is available in three different color schemes, and all of them look rather spiffy for an entry-level motorcycle. And although we’re still on the fence about the overall aesthetic of Triumph’s 400s, we can’t deny that they look well put together. The fuel tank’s design is on point, and while the tail end has a bit of a kick to it, the rear fender arrangement is hella tidy.

Triumph Speed 400 first look
The new Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400 might not look quite as modish as their bigger stablemates, but then again, do they need to? If Triumph is out to attract younger riders on tighter budgets to the brand, these two bikes might just tick the right boxes.

Triumph Motorcycles

Triumph Scrambler 400 X and Speed 400 first look

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