Custom Bikes Of The Week: 21 August, 2016

The best custom motorcycles and cafe racers of the week
A KTM 690 Duke given the retro scrambler treatment, Ducati lets Roland Sands loose on the XDiavel, and one of the best BMW airhead customs we’ve ever seen. Meet the machines that revved our engines this week.

Custom Ducati XDiavel by Roland Sands Design
Ducati XDiavel by RSD Since its launch in 2010, the Diavel family of bikes has always confused me. Its performance has always been second to none, but the Italian muscle bike was just too polarizing in style to be a volume seller. And, in my eyes, it dilutes Ducati’s ‘Ferrari of motorcycles’ brand equity. But, then again, Porsche sells SUVs and even Enzo flogs wagons now, so what do I know?

Launched at this year’s Sturgis motorcycle rally, the Roland Sands Design Ducati XDiavel is a smoothed over power cruiser with just enough panache to raise previously furrowed brows. The standout item on the RSD build has to be the handmade, one-piece tank/seat/tail unit. Impeccably crafted, its flowing and muscular design highlights the ethos of the XDiavel perfectly and delivers the neo-chopper vibe that Bologna just never quite nailed. Other changes include a 19-inch front wheel, an RSD exhaust system and a collection of billet aluminum trim bits that will be available for XDiavel riders looking to personalize their bikes. [More]

BMW R80 cafe racer by Foundry Motorcycles
BMW R80 by Foundry Motorcycle We reckon the number of Bonnevilles, CB750s and airhead Beemers that have been hacked and slashed into “cafe racers” of some sort would rival the search results for “nip slip” on Google. And, while some are standouts, the majority do little to impress or inspire (for both subjects here, really).

This BMW R80 from Tom Simpson at Foundry Motorcycle is more than a standout. It raises the bar for anyone with a boxer build in the works, and seriously furthers the craft of what we consider custom.

Dubbed the Silver R8cer, there isn’t a single line that wanders astray on this package. Built to Tom’s own whims and based on a quick sketch, the Silver R8cer came together just in time to feature at the Bike Shed London Show—but rest assured no corners were cut. The tank was originally intended for a Guzzi build Tom was planning but during mock-up on the R80, the lines fitted perfectly. The Bavarian’s bolt-on subframe was scrapped and a new, stunted unit was welded on. The abrupt ending allows for an intricate under-seat exhaust system, fed by some of the shiniest and most expertly shaped headers we’ve seen in a while.

The design notes are extravagant. The hide that covers the hand-stitched seat is from Rolls-Royce, and Tom cuts, grinds, welds and files every piece of metal until it fits “just how he likes it.” The Silver R8cer is something special. [More]

KTM Duke by Droog Moto Concepts
KTM Duke by Droog Moto Concepts The Duke occupies rarified air in terms of street bike performance. Its 690cc thumper churns out 73 hp in a package that tips scales at a scant 327-lbs (dry). A recipe for pure fun indeed, but the middling Duke does suffer from the ugly-stick syndrome.

But now Max Droog of Arizona’s Droog Moto Concepts has re-worked the ugly Duke-ling into a rolling piece of art. Or in this case, two of them. Starting with two brand new Dukes, Max quickly put the plastics up on eBay and went to work softening the Austrians’ aesthetic edges. Both bikes received new tanks lifted from death machines ATC 3-wheelers that were modded to work with the fuel injection. Custom seats were crafted, as were new side covers and rad-guards. Then a shortened set of Honda CM fenders were fitted, to block the mudslinging from those chunky TKC80s on Kineo wheels.

If you ask us, builds like this would be a perfect factory fit for KTM, combining their history in the dirt and prowess on the street. [More]

Honda FTR223 by Tim Cumper
Honda FTR223 by Tim Cumper When Tim was looking for a donor bike for this build, memories of time spent in Tokyo played a major part. He wanted something small and unique—a bike that could be cleaned up quite readily, and provide a canvas for his incredible machining and modeling skills.

The big-wheeled proportions of the Honda FTR223 sealed the deal for Tim, and he’s built one of the tidiest little trackers we’ve ever seen. Time was no object, so Tim handled almost every facet of the build himself. With a slim silhouette in mind, the Tim quickly replaced the Honda tank with a slender Yamaha FS1 unit and then added a billet aluminum headlight unit—which alone is worthy of a pedestal at the Guggenheim.

But Tim didn’t stop there: The taillight, indicators, under-seat plastics and even the hand-stitched saddle are all Cumper originals. The cleanliness of this build is second to none but we reckon the intricacy of the detailing steals the show. [More]

Lotus C-01 for sale
Lotus C-01 for sale Colin Chapman, the designer who made Lotus a household name, once said, “Money is how we keep score in motor racing these days.” It’s not a statement any of us would argue with trackside, but who exactly is keeping score when creations like this are involved?

The Lotus C-01 is an achingly beautiful and incredibly rare motorcycle. Designed by Daniel Simon, who gave us the Tron Legacy ‘lightcycle,’ only 100 were built. This British Racing Green example is reportedly the only one in North America, and went under the hammer at Mecum’s Monterey auction a couple of days ago with an estimate of between $370,000 and $450,000. Bidding petered out at a much more realistic $190,000, so the bike may still be available.

If you’re in the market for one of these, you probably know that the frame is a chromoly trellis tube unit, and the bodywork is made of 12 carbon fiber sections. Power comes from a KTM RC8R engine, and the suspension is handled by Sachs up front and Öhlins out back. Tipping the scales at around 400 pounds, the C-01 doesn’t exactly subscribe to Chapman’s “add lightness” mantra—but we don’t imagine the person that buys it will care. It will probably never see a kilometer on its clock. [More]