Ducati 750SS custom

Ducati 750SS custom by Wrenchmonkees
I’ve always thought that the best-looking Ducatis are often those that aren’t red. (The Gulf 1098R being a great example.) So I’m pleased to see another Duc in an unfamiliar color scheme: this time, a 750SS. In the early 90s, the 750SS was Ducati’s entry-level exotic—a “parts-bin special” that married the 900SS chassis with a motor related to the 1979 Pantah 500. Today, most owners resist the temptation to modify a 750SS , apart from a little tuning and exhaust tinkering, but not the Danish owner of this well-used 1995 machine. The siren call of the Wrenchmonkees’ Copenhagen workshop was too strong, and here’s the delicious result. The fairing is gone and the paint job is typically understated and classy, transforming the look of the bike. The Wrenchmonkees have also modified the seat and the rear frame loop, and fitted a custom tank, a fiberglass rear end, Tarozzi clipons and a minuscule front fender. The headlight and turn signals are new too, and the standard exhaust has been topped off with a WM Megatron muffler. It’s a light bike—weighing only 160kg or 350lbs—and with 70hp on tap it’ll be pretty quick. The original 750SS has never tempted me, but I’d love one of these in my garage.

Ducati 750SS custom by Wrenchmonkees
Ducati 750SS custom by Wrenchmonkees
Ducati 750SS custom by Wrenchmonkees

  • Mate Tamasko

    I have the same model (93) and this just gave me some ideas…

  • badhairday

    wrenchmonkees world domination! Reduced to seduce, and these guys know how to improve what engineers don’t design. great bunch out there in danmark…

  • Mork

    I like it, although compared to the WM typical fare, this sure looks busy. There is just so much crap going on under that tank. Anyone know where to get one of these Megatron or similar style mufflers stateside?

  • Woody

    The carbs, airbox, battery and some electrical stuff are all under the tank, so it’s gonna be hard to sort out, even for the wrenchmonkees. It’s still a great looking bike, I like the loop they added to the back to round out the look of the seat.

  • http://subcaferacer.com Brendan Falkowski

    I’m not sure trellis frames are suited to cafe motos from a style perspective, but on performance I bet it’s a blast.

  • Bald Shaun

    Sinewy and sexy, like a modern, industrial take on a Vincent Black Shadow. Very cool hybrid of street fighter and cafe racer.

  • http://www.italianmotormagazine.com Adam

    Not so far off a ’97 Ducati Monster 900 I used to own, with carbs and oil de-icer. Seat and muffler work very well.

  • Turgut

    Like the exhausts, like the seat, like the paint job, and of course the trellis frame.

    This is just another case of “you don’t get to understand the real beauty until you take her clothes off..”

    Good work, wrenchmonkees!

  • Lascaz

    MMM….. Lets break down this bike. It has a ducati engine, trellis frame, single headlight, clip- on and is meant to look like a modern day cafe racer, I known what the M stands for …..MONSTER!!! Why blow sunshine up where it doesn’t belong.Granted the execution is well done but why waste all that time and effort when you can buy an off the shelf MONSTER that is identicle.
    What a waste of time!

  • http://www.bikeexif.com Chris

    “Off the shelf”—exactly. This bike is unique, and that’s it’s reason for being. It has token similarities to the Monster, but those come from the base Ducati architecture, not what the Wrenchmonkees have done to it.

  • The_Scrote_From_Lanzarote

    Look very nice *except* for the drab paint. It desperately needs something bright to break the monotonous darkness. As little as single white or orange pinstripe here and there would do wonders.

    Also, I thought this was funny:
    Quoting the MCN link…….”Fuel capacity 748 litres”

  • http://basseq.com John Whittet

    Very skeletal, almost anemic, especially in that silhouette shot. What stood out most to me, I think, are the tires. They add a bit of chunky texture (especially for street tires) that I think is necessary.

    • http://www.bikeexif.com Chris

      Yes, the tires are great. They’re Avon Distanzias, 160/60-17 and 120/70-17, apparently. Originally designed for larger capacity dual-sport bikes, but also seen on some supermotards.

  • http://electrovelocity.com/ Ben Branch

    Does anyone know what tires they are? They’d be perfect for the bike I’m working on at the moment.

  • http://www.bikeexif.com Chris

    Check the comment immediately above yours, Ben …

  • http://electrovelocity.com/ Ben Branch

    Thanks Chris, saw that comment moments after I posted mine and had a “doh!” moment. Am ordering a pair online now. Cheers!

  • johnly

    crotch rocket zonder wind shield ?! NICE

  • larry kahn
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/dan_dan2/ Dan Dan

    i’m going with badhairday on this one, “Reduce to seduce”
    The last pic with the silhouette says it all, Lean and definitely mean.
    WM know what they’re doing, and not a one trick pony doing up every sr 500 or xs 650.
    I absolutely love the BMW they did
    http://www.wrenchmonkees.com/monkee09.html

    the motorcycle gods should be pleased with these guys

  • mudplug

    In many ways it reminds me of the Yamaha SDR200, albeit a beefy 750 Ducati version – and in my books that’s a very good thing.

    I can appreciate both points of view regarding the trellis frame and its impact on the overall result; quote Bald Shaun: “industrial” – hits the nail on the head. You couldn’t possibly hide everything behind the trellis – unless you hid it inside the trellis!

  • Bluey

    I believe the 750ss are very under rated machines. The 900ss dominated the market with it’s larger motor. I must point out that the 750ss has a wet clutch, therefore no clutch rattle. Paso & 750F1’s had dry clutches, these did not rattle noticeably either. Ducati clutch rattle surfaced with the 900ss when they changed the position of the clutch slave cylinder to the Lf. hand side were it picks up the crud off the drive chain & is renown for failing.

    Although I appreciate what this bike is, I love the “Keep it Simple” approach.
    I find this bike drab and lacking something, maybe a touch of red.

    I have a 750 Paso, MUCH modified, although the motor is std. it has 42mm Dellortos, Upside-down forks & a Vellechi style trellis frame (abiet My Grandfathers axe). I have messed with both the electrical & cam timing and it weighs in at 140Kg (306lbs) with 3 litres of fuel on board. As it has no lighting system, it is not road legal. It puts out 75 bhp at the rear wheel & beats std 900ss in a straight line as well as round the corners.

  • http://www.citybike.com Gabe Ets-Hokin

    “Lascaz said:
    Monday 19th July, 2010 at 6:18 pm |
    MMM….. Lets break down this bike. It has a ducati engine, trellis frame, single headlight, clip- on and is meant to look like a modern day cafe racer, I known what the M stands for …..MONSTER!!! Why blow sunshine up where it doesn’t belong.Granted the execution is well done but why waste all that time and effort when you can buy an off the shelf MONSTER that is identicle.
    What a waste of time!”

    Waste of time? The Monster is an entirely different animal, one I never cared for much until Ducati introduced the 696. The Supersport, to me, is the perfect chassis: stable, with progressive, responsive steering. The Monster just never felt right. You can also pick up a Supersport to build into a streetfighter very inexpensively. Waste of time? If that’s really your opinion on custom bikes, maybe you should just buy a car; I don’t think you get it.

  • Hilly

    It’s cool if a little ratrod, there’s only one modified ducati I’d entertain and that’s JVB’s scrambler, absolutely stunning…

  • dr death

    naked rules! God, every other crotch rocket with a pipe looks the same as the last. most are piloted by wanna-be’s who barely know where the gas goes… that was jest, but you all know what im talking about. anyhow, nice bike. always cool to see a duck done up n looking like a real motorcycle. man, i sound like an old guy.