Street to Dirt: Analog’s Harley-Davidson Street 750

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
Love it or hate it, the Harley-Davidson Street 750 is gaining traction. But its popularity is highest outside of the US, where consumers aren’t as phased by the idea of a Harley with less cubic inches.

A number of builders have already proven that it responds well to customization. Tony Prust of Analog Motorcycles is the latest to join their ranks—with this sublime dirtbike-esque Street.

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
By Tony’s own admission, Analog “don’t mess with Harley-Davidsons much.” But when Tom Wronkovich—from Bike Town Harley-Davidson and goods supplier Whiskey Grade—got in touch, Tony was all in.

“The goal was for Analog Motor Goods to try and develop some parts for the model,” Tony says. “Sales were low, and Tom wanted me to come up with a kit to sell to dealers to improve the look of the Street.”

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
At the same time, Harley-Davidson USA launched a dealership custom contest around the Street. So Tom and Tony decided that Analog would collaborate with Bike Town to create a competitive entry.

“Tom suggested a Scrambler, but with the deadline only a little over a month away to submit the build I was a bit skeptical. Of course, I am always up for a challenge—so I agreed.”

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
To spread the load, the Bike Town team was tasked with sorting out the wheels. Tony wanted to swap over to a spoked setup with Continental TKC80 tires. He briefed the guys on sizes and colors, and they sourced rims and spokes from Buchanan’s and took it from there, using Harley-Davidson hubs to match everything up.

With that sorted, Tony moved to the rear of the bike—jacking it up with a set of Fox Podium RC1 shocks. Shaping the seat pan turned out to be quite a challenge; the competition rules stipulated that the frame couldn’t be modified, so Tony had to work around it.

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
Cotter Pin was called in to supply a tool book, luggage roll and map pocket—along with some extra leather, which Rod’s Designs used to upholster the seat. Free Form Design CNC-milled the aluminum luggage rack and foot pegs to the same design as those used on Analog’s Ducati ‘Super Scrambler.’

The rear fender is custom—topped with an Analog Motor Goods Revolver tail light—while the front fender’s the stock unit, modified. Discreet LED turn signals are mounted on custom brackets at both ends. Keeping with the scrambler motif are a set of dirt bike bars, Oury grips and a hand-made headlight grill.

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
Analog’s signature handiwork is sprinkled throughout the Harley. The side covers and radiator cover are sporting perforated stainless steel accents, and the license plate bracket and toe shifter are one-offs. A HEL braided brake hose has been installed up front for good measure.

The exhaust system is Tony’s work too—a two-into-one stainless steel system, terminating in a Cone Engineering muffler. Keeping the rider’s leg cool is a heat shield cut to spec by Free Form and shaped by Tony to fit. The air filter’s a Boyle Customs part, and is mounted on a custom-made offset plate.

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
Last on the list was the paint job, but right then the project hit a major snag.

“Tom called me, and we read the rules of the HD contest and discovered we were not in compliance,” explains Tony. “The dealership was supposed to take care of the whole build—and since I was not a dealership employee, we couldn’t submit the bike.”

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.
Still, Tom was so pleased with how the Street had turned out, he saw it as the perfect vehicle for Whiskey Grade. So Tony whipped up some branding stencils and quickly intercepted paint guru Kiel Kustoms to inform him of the new plans.

Analog and Bike Town never had the opportunity to pit the aptly-named “Dirt750” against their rivals. But at least the crew at Whiskey Grade Cleveland have a new shop bike to blast around on. And Analog’s customers will soon be looking at the Street 750 with new eyes.

Analog Motorcycles | Facebook | Images by Whiplash Racing Media

Instagram: @analogmotorcycles @analogmotorgoods @whiskeygrade @harleydavidson

Street to Dirt: a Harley-Davidson Street 750 scrambler by Analog Motorcycles.