Speed Read: The Breitling x Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR and more

The latest custom motorcycles, special edition bikes, and rare classics.
Another week, another limited edition from a major OEM. This time, it’s Triumph teaming up with Breitling on a special Speed Triple 1200 RR with a matching watch. We also have a BMW R850RT from Spain, a new flat track prototype based on the Royal Enfield Himalayan 450, and a rare Honda Monkey Baja Africa that’s just gone up for sale.

Breitling x Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR limited edition
Breitling x Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR It seems like Ducati and Triumph are locked in a ping-pong match, taking turns at delivering special edition motorcycles at a rate of knots. The latest volley comes from the British marque, and it’s a real humdinger.

This particular collaboration sees Triumph partner with the luxury Swiss watchmaker Breitling, to release a limited edition of one of my favorite motorcycles—the Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR. Limited to 270 units worldwide, this version of the Speed Triple 1200 RR sports Breitling branding, a handful of tasty bits, and a special livery. Breitling’s contribution is a matching version of their Chronomat wristwatch; sold separately, of course.

Breitling x Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR limited edition
In stock form, the Speed Triple 1200 RR is one heck of a motorcycle. It takes the Speed Triple’s peachy 177 hp triple-cylinder mill and partners it with electronically controlled semi-active suspension from Öhlins. Packaged as a retro sportbike-slash-café racer, it goes even better than it looks, offering magic carpet ride levels of maneuverability.

The Speed Triple 1200 RR is normally available in either red or white. Both look good, but the Breitling edition’s paint job blows them out of the water. It’s mostly a monochromatic affair, with hand-painted gold striping cutting through large sections of black and titanium.

Breitling x Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR limited edition
That same gold hue is carried through the bike’s branding, and the Breitling logo atop the fuel tank. There’s more Breitling branding etched into the top yoke, which also features each bike’s individual number. A Breitling logo on the rear wheel hub adds another stylish touch, while a Breitling-specific startup screen on the TFT dash drives the point home.

Along with the pretty paint job, this version of the Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR also gets a smattering of swanky carbon fiber bits, luxe leather upholstery, and an Akrapovič muffler. It’ll set you back $25,995 in the US [£22,995.00 in the UK], versus the ‘regular’ Speed Triple 1200 RR’s price of between $20,950 and $21,275 (depending on the color).

Breitling x Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR limited edition
Breitling’s complementary watch, officially named the Chronomat B01 42 Triumph, ain’t bad looking either. Made from titanium and 18k red gold, it boasts an anthracite dial and a perforated brown leather strap, with subtle Triumph branding in strategic places. I think Triumph and Breitling missed a trick by not matching the strap leather to the Speed Triple’s seat, but it’s a gorgeous timepiece nonetheless.

Owners of the Breitling edition Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR can also purchase an exclusive made-to-order version of the Chronomat B01 42 Triumph. This one has a carbon dial, a brown alligator strap, and the motorcycle’s series number engraved on the back of the case, to create a matching set. [More]

Custom BMW R850RT by Ad Hoc Café Racers
BMW R850RT by Ad Hoc The quirky early-2000s BMW R850RT doesn’t get as much love as its big brother, the R1100RT—mostly because it’s just as big but less powerful. It was a hit as a cop bike in many countries though, and it’s not uncommon to find secondhand examples in police trim.

This particular BMW R850RT is an ex-Spanish police bike, but it’s shed its sirens, radio gear, and panniers in favor of a more svelte setup. It’s the work of David Gonzalez at Ad Hoc Café Racers, and it perfectly reflects his brutalist, out-of-the-box aesthetic.

Custom BMW R850RT by Ad Hoc Café Racers
Once David and co. had stripped all the cop gear off the BMW R850RT, they went a step further by axing its unique Telelever front suspension system.

The Telelever isn’t something you can just delete in an afternoon, so the crew had to fabricate a new front frame and rework the steering neck. A Suzuki GSX-R then loaned the R850RT its upside-down forks, Nissin calipers, and Brembo disc brakes, matched to a 17” spoked wheel.

Custom BMW R850RT by Ad Hoc Café Racers
For the bodywork, Ad Hoc took an old Gilera 125 fuel tank, then hacked it up and added a tail section to it to create a one-piece body. They also rebuilt the underside of the tank to accommodate the bike’s OEM fuel pump and all of the other essential parts. A custom subframe props up the ultra-sharp tailpiece.

Up front, you’ll find a medium-sized headlight, low clip-on bars, and a digital dashboard. Further down, custom-made stainless steel headers sashay their way into an Akrapovič silencer. Alternating gloss and matte black finishes add to the stark, minimalist vibe. [Ad Hoc Café Racers | Images by Karlos Rodriguez]

Royal Enfield Himalayan 411 flat track prototype
Royal Enfield Himalayan 450 flat track prototype Ever since we caught a glimpse of the Harris Performance-designed Royal Enfield Twin FT Concept, it was clear that Royal Enfield is serious about flat track racing. Now, Sideburn Magazine has laid eyes on the company’s latest flat track racing prototype.

Built in-house at Royal Enfield’s Technical Center in Leicestershire, UK, the Himalayan 450 Racer was developed with the help of multiple UK champion Gary Birtwistle, who also races the bike. It uses the liquid-cooled engine from Royal Enfield’s brand new, second-generation Himalayan 450, along with the stock bike’s main frame. But it cuts a very different silhouette.

Royal Enfield Himalayan 411 flat track prototype
A braced Harris Performance chromoly swingarm does duty out back, with an aluminum subframe perched above it. Sideburn reports that the geometry is close to that of a Rotax framer, making it a more compact machine than the dirt bike-derived 450s that it races against.

Draped over the top of the bike is a carbon monocoque body, hiding an aluminum fuel cell. The wheels, brake rotor carrier, and adjustable-offset yokes all come from Lowery Racing in the USA, while the adjustable forks and rear shock are from Nitron in the UK. The cockpit features ProTaper bars fitted with a ProTaper clutch perch and Motion Pro throttle, with titanium footpegs fitted lower down.

Royal Enfield Himalayan 411 flat track prototype
The bike also wears several one-off parts—including a 3D-printed airbox with a quick-change Twinair filter. Royal Enfield is keeping mum on the internal engine mods, confirming only that the bike has a programmable ECU, stainless steel exhaust header, and Arrow muffler.

Gary has already logged fourth- and sixth-place finishes at the Himalayan 450 Racer’s first two races, which is impressive for a brand-new prototype that still has teething issues. We’re excited to see how this project develops—and we’re holding thumbs that some of this styling carries through to Royal Enfield’s road bikes down the line. [Source]

Rare Honda Monkey Baja Africa for sale
For Sale: Honda Monkey Baja Africa I’ll never not marvel at Ben Branch’s ability to unearth oddball motorcycles. The Silodrome editor’s latest discovery is this rare—and utterly adorable—Honda Monkey Baja Africa, currently for sale via Bring a Trailer.

To understand the Honda Monkey Baja Africa, you must first understand the Honda Monkey Baja.

Rare Honda Monkey Baja Africa for sale
First released in 1991, the Honda Monkey Baja was a version of the Monkey that was heavily stylized to look like the legendary Honda XLR250R Baja. Its fuel tank, seat, and rear fender were all modeled after the XLR’s, and it wore a smaller copy of the XLR’s signature twin headlight setup.

The Honda Monkey Baja Africa pushed the concept further, by restyling the Monkey Baja as a miniature replica of the Honda Africa Twin. Honda never released it as a complete model though—instead, they sold it as a kit, designed specifically for the Honda Monkey Baja.

Rare Honda Monkey Baja Africa for sale
The kit included all the bodywork and associated mounting hardware needed to make the change, including a ‘faux’ fuel tank that would mount over the stock reservoir. It also came with a solid bash plate that was a dead ringer for the chunky unit on the Africa Twin.

This particular example is sitting in Florida, and is currently listed on Bring a Trailer with a mere 360 km [224 miles] on the clock. Who else is tempted to add this to their garage? [Source]

Rare Honda Monkey Baja Africa for sale

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